Santisimo Cristo de Candas Chess Open begins on Friday
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


The Chess Open Santisimo Cristo de Candas is set to take place from September 2 to 10 in Candas, Spain. There are 93 players registered for the tournament with GM Salvador Del Rio De Angelis, who recently shared the first place at the very strong Isthmia Open in Greece, being the top seed, according to www.chessdom.com. 

Candás is one of 12 parishes (administrative divisions) in Carreño, a municipality within the province and autonomous community of Asturias, in northern Spain. 



Top-10 starting list:
1 GM Del Rio De Angelis Salvador G ESP 2509
2 FM Gonzalez Perez Arian CUB 2490
3 GM Martinez Duanny Lelys Stanley CUB 2455
4 FM Gonzalez Menendez Ivan ESP 2448
5 FM Alvarez Fernandez Enrique ESP 2377
6 FM Aguera Naredo Javier ESP 2360
7 IM Boudy Bueno Julio Leonardo CUB 2285
8 FM Roiz Baztan David ESP 2282
9 FM Bajo Gutierrez Ignacio ESP 2264
10 Alonso Alvarez Aitor ESP 2251 
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Surreal chess set made of cork!
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


We found this cool set of photos for – of all things – a chess set made of cork. Wow. Imagine how surreal it would feel to touch those pieces made of cork!



csoport Chess set made of corks
5 Chess set made of corks

72 Chess set made of corks
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World Chess Cup R2 pairings for Wednesday’s games (Results updated)
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hello everyone,




Here are the Round 2.1 pairings at the World Cup of Chess currently on in Khanty Mansiysk. We are down to 64 players and the chess games are sure to be brilliant at the event – as in the first round. Don’t forget to follow the super action in High Definition at the official website.


Round 2 pairings


1 GM Karjakin, Sergey RUS – GM So, Wesley PHI
2 GM Alekseev, Evgeny RUS – GM Ivanchuk, Vassily UKR
3 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE – GM Fridman, Daniel GER
4 GM Ni, Hua CHN – GM Ponomariov, Ruslan UKR
5 GM Gashimov, Vugar AZE – GM Azarov, Sergei BLR
6 GM Feller, Sebastien FRA – GM Grischuk, Alexander RUS
7 GM Radjabov, Teimour AZE – GM Negi, Parimarjan IND
8 GM Kasimdzhanov, Rustam UZB – GM Kamsky, Gata USA
9 GM Svidler, Peter RUS – GM Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son VIE
10 GM Harikrishna, P. IND – GM Jakovenko, Dmitry RUS
11 GM Vitiugov, Nikita RUS – GM Korobov, Anton UKR
12 GM Parligras, Mircea-Emilian ROU – GM Almasi, Zoltan HUN
13 GM Vallejo Pons, Francisco ESP – GM Bruzon Batista, Lazaro CUB
14 GM Onischuk, Alexander USA – GM Navara, David CZE
15 GM Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime FRA – GM Bu, Xiangzhi CHN
16 GM Bologan, Viktor MDA – GM Dominguez Perez, Leinier CUB
17 GM Ivanov, Alexander USA – GM Kobalia, Mikhail RUS
18 GM Gupta, Abhijeet IND – GM Shankland, Samuel L USA
19 GM Moiseenko, Alexander UKR – GM Inarkiev, Ernesto RUS
20 GM Grachev, Boris RUS – GM Le, Quang Liem VIE
21 GM Adams, Michael ENG – GM Nielsen, Peter Heine DEN
22 GM Potkin, Vladimir RUS – GM Shirov, Alexei ESP
23 GM Jobava, Baadur GEO – GM Wojtaszek, Radoslaw POL
24 GM Drozdovskij, Yuri UKR – GM Caruana, Fabiano ITA
25 GM Nepomniachtchi, Ian RUS – GM Riazantsev, Alexander RUS
26 GM Filippov, Anton UZB – GM Bacrot, Etienne FRA
27 GM Fier, Alexandr BRA – GM Morozevich, Alexander RUS
28 GM Andreikin, Dmitry RUS – GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny RUS
9 GM Efimenko, Zahar UKR – GM Berkes, Ferenc HUN
30 GM Zherebukh, Yaroslav UKR – GM Felgaer, Ruben ARG
31 GM Sutovsky, Emil ISR – GM Fressinet, Laurent FRA
32 GM Polgar, Judit HUN – GM Movsesian, Sergei ARM




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Tuesday Chess Test: What should White play?
Chess blog for latest chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


Okay no straining you after the chess at the World Cup of Chess. Here is a simple chess position for you to study. What should White play? Look closely, the answer will strike you soon enough. Enjoy.








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Leko explains his break from chess!
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

While we are on the subject of Peter Leko being knocked out from the first round in the World Cup of Chess that just started in Khanty Mansiysk and while we are on the subject of whether you can stay without your regular chess ‘fix’, here’s a nice article from Chess In Translation. It’s about Peter Leko explaining his return to chess after a break. 



One of the stories of the recent World Team Championship in China was the return of Peter Leko after a long absence from competitive chess. He played as though he’d never been away, posting an unbeaten 2800+ performance. In an interview he revealed what was behind his decision.


The interview came as part of Vladimir Barsky’s fifth round report for the Russia Chess Federation website. At the time Hungary had recovered from a slow start to post a remarkable sequence of three wins over Azerbaijan, Ukraine and Israel. Peter Leko was instrumental, winning his games on top board against the latter two teams (note you can play through all Leko’s games in China in the viewer after the interview).

To begin with, why is it so long since we’ve seen Peter Leko in action?

I wanted to take a certain break. For the last 10 or even 15 years I’ve been playing non-stop at the very highest level, and after last year’s Dortmund I decided to take a break. True, I still had to play at the Olympiad for the Hungarian team; I didn’t perform very well there, but that no longer had any influence on my decision.

You simply wanted to take a rest from chess?
Yes, that was the original plan. But after two weeks I sensed I couldn’t get by without chess, it was my life, and I started to work on it. I decided that I wouldn’t play before the World Team Championship, and it was very pleasant simply to work while not experiencing the continual stress of knowing that tomorrow you’re again playing against Anand, Kramnik, Aronian or Carlsen, and you’ve got nothing in the opening!… Simply to work on chess and not think about what to play tomorrow. Of course, it was very hard in the first round here. It’s even hard just now! My head isn’t yet working automatically. After a 9-month break it’s not so easy. You can play training games at home but that’s completely different – you don’t feel as though a real battle’s going on.

Go on, read further.
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US Chess Trust Question of the Month: Is There Such A Thing As A Chess Player’s High?
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


This is a very interesting question we chanced upon at the website of the US Chess Trust. A very apt video goes along with the question. So, what do you think?


We’ve all heard of the “runner’s high”, which occurs when endorphins are activated by strenuous exercise.
Does something similar happen to chess players?
We’ve all reported feeling the “itch” to play.
Are we unknowingly craving a release of endorphins?
We all have experienced that “Aha” moment, when a difficult problem becomes clear. The solving of a thorny puzzle has always given me a feeling of satisfaction.
Is that feeling endorphin related, or is it something else?
Runners speak of a sense of unease when they can’t get in their regular run. We all know chess players who get antsy, if they can’t get a game.
Is basic brain chemistry responsible for those feelings?


You can post your answers here or at the USChessTrust link.
From Alexandra Kosteniuk’s
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World Chess Cup R1.2: Leko, Wang Yue, Hou Yifan and others knocked out
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011



Hi everyone,
The 2011 FIDE World Cup is a 128-player knock-out taking place August 27-September 20 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Siberia. The tournament delivers three participants for the next Candidates tournament/matches, as part of the new World Championship cycle. Except for the final, all rounds have 2-game matches at the FIDE time control: 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with a 30-second increment from the first move. In case of a 1-1 tie, on the third day of the round a tie-break with four rapid games and if necessary blitz games and an Armageddon.


Find the complete pairings graphical representation at this link.

You can access the official website at this link. See the full list of the Round 1.1 and Round 1.2 game results at this link. We will have the final list of players for Round 2 after the tiebreaks. Here are some nice games from Round 1.2.







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‘One chess tournament and nuke threat’
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


A chess tournament in Dubai, nuclear threats, thieving gigs and more – that’s the plot of Leverage series episode 10 – The Queen’s Gambit Job. 

Leverage is an American television drama series on TNT produced by director/executive producer Dean Devlin‘s production company Electric Television.Leverage follows a five-person team: a thief, a grifter, a hacker and a retrieval specialist, headed up by former insurance investigator Nathan Ford, who use their skills to right corporate and governmental injustices inflicted on ordinary citizens.


Here is the promo of the episode 10 that was aired on August 25, 2011.





Stars: Timothy Hutton, Gina Bellman, Christian Kane, Beth Riesgraf, Aldis Hodge
Writer: M. Scott Veach, Rebecca Kirsch
Director: Jonathan Frakes
Network: TNT, Sunday nights
Original Telecast: August 25, 2011






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Monday Chess Puzzle: Can White get out of the perpetual check?
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


This is one of those chess positions where you spend hours setting it up and then Black seems to have got a perpetual in place and you have to frown, fret and fume but give away a draw…
Or, is it?
Can White get out of the perpetual here and actually win this game?


Kretchmer-Lauhe Eisenach, 1951







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Former British Champion GM Sadler wins Sants Chess Open in Barcelona
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

This is the big comeback news for 2011. Congratulations to former British Chess Champion and and Olympiad gold medalist Matthew Sadler for winning the 13th Sants Chess Open in Barcelona on Sunday with a score of 8.5/10. 

This was his first long Swiss event in more than a decade!

The English grandmaster defeated top seed Jan Smeets in the final round to finish half a point ahead of Eduardo Iturrizaga, Aramis Alvarez Pedraza, Marc Narciso Dublan and Hector Delgado Ramos. Sadler also recently won his other classical chess tournament since 1999 – the Haarlem Weekender in July 2010. This year he had also won that jointly with Dutch GM Erik van den Doel.



Sadler (l.) in July, winning in Haarlem again, shared with Van den Doel (r.)

The 13th Sants Open took place August 19-28 in the Auditorium of the Civic Centre in the Sants neighbourhood in south Barcelona, Spain. Sants used to be an industrial town on the plain bordering Barcelona, known as Santa Maria de Sants; nowadays it belongs to the district of Sants-Montjuïc.

The tournament was a 10-round Swiss with a record 659 participants. They were divided over two groups, the strongest being for players rated 2000 and higher. The top group had 29 GMs and 45 IMs fighting for a 2,500 Euro first prize. The FIDE rate of play was applied: 90 minutes for 40 moves plus 30 minutes to finish the game, with 30 seconds increment from move 1.



Sadler in action in Sants, Barcelona

You can read this very nice report in English at www.chessvibes.com plus the official website in Spanish at this link.
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World Chess Cup R1 off to a rocking start
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


The World Cup of Chess 2011 is off to a rocking start in the Ugra region of Khanty-Mansiysk. If you haven’t seen it, you must not miss it now: The awesome HD live coverage of the event at the official website. Follow the live computer game analysis at this link.


For now, here are the first round results and some nice decisive first round games. You will need a couple of hours to go through them but worth the investment. Have a great chessy start to the week.
:)








Round 1. Game 1


1
Kaabi, Mejdi (TUN)
0−1
Karjakin, Sergey (RUS)
2
Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR)
1−0
Steel, Henry Robert (RSA)
3
Ibrahim, Hatim (EGY)
0−1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar (AZE)
4
Ponomariov, Ruslan (UKR)
1−0
Gwaze, Robert (ZIM)
5
Hansen, Eric (CAN)
0−1
Gashimov, Vugar (AZE)
6
Grischuk, Alexander (RUS)
1−0
Genba, Vladimir (RUS)
7
De La Paz Perdomo, Frank (CUB)
0−1
Radjabov, Teimour (AZE)
8
Kamsky, Gata (USA)
1−0
Di Berardino, Diego Rafae (BRA)
9
Lima, Darcy (BRA)
½-½
Svidler, Peter (RUS)
10
Jakovenko, Dmitry (RUS)
1−0
Salem, A.R. Saleh (UAE)
11
Bezgodov, Alexei (RUS)
½-½
Vitiugov, Nikita (RUS)
12
Almasi, Zoltan (HUN)
1−0
El Gindy, Essam (EGY)
13
Cori, Jorge (PER)
0−1
Vallejo Pons, Francisco (ESP)
14
Navara, David (CZE)
1−0
Kabanov, Nikolai (RUS)
15
Rahman, Ziaur (BAN)
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime (FRA)
16
Dominguez Perez, Leinier (CUB)
1−0
Moradiabadi, Elshan (IRI)
17
Ivanov, Alexander (USA)
1−0F
Wang, Hao (CHN)
18
Leko, Peter (HUN)
0−1
Shankland, Samuel L (USA)
19
Esen, Baris (TUR)
½-½
Moiseenko, Alexander (UKR)
20
Le, Quang Liem (VIE)
1−0
Megaranto, Susanto (INA)
21
Paragua, Mark (PHI)
0−1
Adams, Michael (ENG)
22
Shirov, Alexei (ESP)
1−0
Leon Hoyos, Manuel (MEX)
23
Guliyev, Namig (AZE)
0−1
Jobava, Baadur (GEO)
24
Caruana, Fabiano (ITA)
1−0
Pridorozhni, Aleksei (RUS)
25
Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynal (CUB)
0−1
Nepomniachtchi, Ian (RUS)
26
Bacrot, Etienne (FRA)
½-½
Robson, Ray (USA)
27
Fier, Alexandr (BRA)
1−0
Wang, Yue (CHN)
28
Tomashevsky, Evgeny (RUS)
1−0
Zhao, Zong-Yuan (AUS)
29
Babula, Vlastimil (CZE)
½-½
Efimenko, Zahar (UKR)
30
Malakhov, Vladimir (RUS)
½-½
Felgaer, Ruben (ARG)
31
Vorobiov, Evgeny E. (RUS)
½-½
Sutovsky, Emil (ISR)
32
Movsesian, Sergei (ARM)
1−0
Hou, Yifan (CHN)
33
Corrales Jimenez, Fidel (CUB)
0−1
Polgar, Judit (HUN)
34
Fressinet, Laurent (FRA)
1−0
Jumabayev, Rinat (KAZ)
35
Zherebukh, Yaroslav (UKR)
½-½
Eljanov, Pavel (UKR)
36
Berkes, Ferenc (HUN)
1−0
Mareco, Sandro (ARG)
37
Kazhgaleyev, Murtas (KAZ)
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry (RUS)
38
Morozevich, Alexander (RUS)
½-½
Halkias, Stelios (GRE)
39
Filippov, Anton (UZB)
1−0
Zhigalko, Sergei (BLR)
40
Riazantsev, Alexander (RUS)
1−0
Bluvshtein, Mark (CAN)
41
Drozdovskij, Yuri (UKR)
½-½
Motylev, Alexander (RUS)
42
Wojtaszek, Radoslaw (POL)
1−0
Pashikian, Arman (ARM)
43
Shulman, Yuri (USA)
½-½
Potkin, Vladimir (RUS)
44
Nielsen, Peter Heine (DEN)
½-½
Postny, Evgeny (ISR)
45
Romanov, Evgeny (RUS)
½-½
Grachev, Boris (RUS)
46
Inarkiev, Ernesto (RUS)
1−0
Salgado Lopez, Ivan (ESP)
47
Gupta, Abhijeet (IND)
½-½
Mamedov, Rauf (AZE)
48
Kobalia, Mikhail (RUS)
½-½
Lysyj, Igor (RUS)
49
Socko, Bartosz (POL)
0−1
Bologan, Viktor (MDA)
50
Bu, Xiangzhi (CHN)
1−0
Adly, Ahmed (EGY)
51
Ivanisevic, Ivan (SRB)
½-½
Onischuk, Alexander (USA)
52
Bruzon Batista, Lazaro (CUB)
½-½
Quesada Perez, Yuniesky (CUB)
53
Parligras, Mircea-Emilian (ROU)
1−0
Yu, Yangyi (CHN)
54
Korobov, Anton (UKR)
1−0
Zhou, Jianchao (CHN)
55
Rodshtein, Maxim (ISR)
0−1
Harikrishna, P. (IND)
56
Li, Chao b (CHN)
½-½
Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son (VIE)
57
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter (ROU)
0−1
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam (UZB)
58
Akopian, Vladimir (ARM)
0−1F
Negi, Parimarjan (IND)
59
Iordachescu, Viorel (MDA)
1−0
Feller, Sebastien (FRA)
60
Timofeev, Artyom (RUS)
½-½
Azarov, Sergei (BLR)
61
Khairullin, Ildar (RUS)
½-½
Ni, Hua (CHN)
62
Fridman, Daniel (GER)
½-½
Lupulescu, Constantin (ROU)
63
Ragger, Markus (AUT)
½-½
Alekseev, Evgeny (RUS)
64
So, Wesley (PHI)
½-½
Ding, Liren (CHN)




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Great chess interview with Russian Champion 2011 GM Peter Svidler
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

After Peter Svidler won the 2011 Russian Championship he gave a long interview to Vladimir Barsky for the Russian Chess Federation website. Barsky had been with Svidler at the World Team Championship in Ningbo, China, so had witnessed the dramatic change of fortune between the two events first-hand. Here is an excerpt from the  the English translation. You can read the full interview at ChessInTranslation.


It seems you’ve already won the Russian Championship by every possible system?Yes. 1994 and 1995 (Swiss tournaments), 1997 (knockout), 1998 (Swiss[Vladimir Barsky notes Svidler was second on tiebreakers]), 2003 (Swiss), 2008 (a round robin with 12 players), and this one.



Which victory was dearest to you, the most memorable?

Probably the first and the last. Well, the first for obvious reasons, and this one – because in the last few years… I can’t say I haven’t demonstrated anything good at all, but a success like this one that you can point your finger at and say – look at that! – there haven’t been any of those. The victory in Gibraltar was good, there was a mass of good chess players and I scored quite a lot of points, but nevertheless it was an open tournament. Therefore this was a very important victory and I’m very glad about it.

You played a very interesting, fighting game against Grischuk. You’ve worked closely which each other and recently you were together at the Candidates Matches. What’s it like to play someone you know that well?

Sanya [a short form of Alexander in Russian] and I haven’t simply worked together a lot – we’ve got a very good relationship. He’s an extremely interesting chess player and one who’s very interesting to play against. Therefore if it was possible to find so  Therefore if it was possible to find something to play that we hadn’t looked at together… The main problem was that there were some regions of opening theory which it would be uncomfortable for him to play against me, or me against him, as we’d built up a certain baggage of common analysis. As for simply playing against Sanya – it’s interesting and a pleasure because you’ve got a strong and unconventional chess player sitting opposite you.

If you’re talking about the goals I set myself before the tournament then I wanted to stretch myself as much as possible, to play every game at some sort of limit. From that point of view any game against Grischuk is interesting for me as I rate him very, very highly as a chess player. When I’m in a normal condition and not getting beaten around in every game then I relish the chance to play against strong players.


Go on read further here.
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Where is chess great Gary Kasparov?
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

According to www.chessdom.com we have the latest chess update about the World Chess Champion Gary Kasparov! The 1st ADX Chess Festival is set to take place from Tuesday at Hotel Sheraton WTC in São Paulo, Brazil. Gary Kasparov will lecture at the event. In the evening the 5th SP Masters Series will be played with Garry Kasparov in attendance.

The ADX (Associacao para o Desenvolvimento do Xadrez) officially launches its website and announces a milestone event for the Brazilian chess.



The press conference will be broadcasted live at livestream.com/adxlive at around 1:30 PM GMT time.





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World Chess Cup 2011 begins in Ugra region of Khanty-Mansiysk
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,



FIDE president Kirsan Ilyumzhinov declared the 2011 FIDE World Cup officially open on Saturday. The first round scheduled at 15:00 local time (11:00 CET) on Sunday. A total of 128 participants from all over the world will play in a knock-out format that would run for three weeks after which we will have the next Candidates tournament/matches, as part of the new World Championship cycle. The tournament takes place from August 27 till September 20. Russia’s Ugra region in Khanty-Mansiysk is hosting the World Cup for the fourth time. The only two women players in the field are Women’s World No. 1 Judit Polgar and Women’s World Champion Hou Yifan from Hungary and China respectively.

Venue is the brand new Ugorian Chess Academy, a unique three-level building without sharp corners styled as a chess piece. It was built in the capital of Ugra in 2008-2010 and designed by the famous Dutch architect Erick Van Egeraat
.     



There are 128 participants from 46 different countries. However, shortly before the event both Vladimir Akopian of Armenia and Wang Hao of China had to cancel the participation. The former broke a leg recently; the latter was diagnosed with heart problems. Their opponents (Parimarjan Negi and Alexander Ivanov respectively) will go through to the second round without playing.

Chess Vibes has a nice JPEG of the pairings tree which you can check in your browser here.

System and rate of play

Except for the final, all rounds will have 2-game matches at the FIDE time control: 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with a 30-second increment from the first move. In case of a 1-1 tie, on the third day of the round a tie-break is played. A tie-break consists of 2 games (25 minutes + 10 seconds increment). In case of a 2-2 score, 2 more games will be played at 10 minutes + 10 seconds increment and then, if needed, 2 games of 5 minutes + 3 increment. If necessary, the tie-break will end with an Armageddon game with White getting 5 minutes and Black 4 and 3 seconds increment starting from move 61. In this game, a draw means the player behind the black pieces goes through. The final will played over 4 games at the FIDE time control and if necessary a tie-break on the day of the closing ceremony.
Opening ceremony

Schedule
Date Time Event # Players

August 26 – Arrival
August 27 20:00 Opening ceremony
August 28 15:00 Round 1.1 128
August 29 15:00 Round 1.2
August 30 15:00 Tie-break R1
August 31 15:00 Round 2.1 64
September 1 15:00 Round 2.2
September 2 15:00 Tie-break R2
September 3 15:00 Round 3.1 32
September 4 15:00 Round 3.2
September 5 15:00 Tie-break R3
September 6 15:00 Round 4.1 16
September 7 15:00 Round 4.2
September 8 15:00 Tie-break R4
September 9 15:00 Round 5.1 8
September 10 15:00 Round 5.2
September 11 15:00 Tie-break R5
September 12 15:00 Round 6.1 4
September 13 15:00 Round 6.2
September 14 15:00 Tie-break R6
September 15 Free day
September 16 15:00 Round 7.1 2
September 17 15:00 Round 7.2
September 18 15:00 Round 7.3
September 19 15:00 Round 7.4
September 20 11:00 Tie-break R7
September 20 20:00 Closing ceremony

You can access the official website here. You can see the very nice video there. 
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Morozevich explains his chess win with rare line over Svidler
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

For a chess-lazy-fun Sunday here is a real cool translation in English of the Russian article of Alexander Morozevich explaining his win over Peter Svidler from the ChessInTranslation.


We have also added the super Chess Blog gameplayer here so you can run the full game before you check out the analysis.


A little of the shine was taken off Peter Svidler’s victory at the Russian Championship Superfinal when he lost in the final round. The mercurial Alexander Morozevich later showed an audience how he used a rare opening line to beat Svidler and snatch clear second place in the tournament.

Morozevich’s demonstration was transcribed by Vladimir Barsky in his Round 7 photo report for the Russian Chess Federation website.




Alexander Morozevich – Peter Svidler
Notes by Alexander Morozevich

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Qb3 dxc4 6.Qxc4 0-0 7.e4 a6 8.e5 b5 9.Qb3 Nfd7 10.Be2 A rare move, to which I think Peter reacted correctly. 



10…c5 11.e6 fxe6 12.Qxe6+ Kh8 13.dxc5 Ne5 Also possible was 13…Nxc5 14.Qe3 with a sufficiently playable position.

14.Qd5 Qxd5 15.Nxd5 Bb7 It seems Peter mixed something up. I thought Black had to start with 15…Nxf3+, and here you get an approximately equal ending: 16.Bxf3 (there’s nothing after 16.gxf3 Nc6) 16…Bb7 17.Nc7 Bxf3 18.gxf3 Ra7 19.Ne6 Rxf3. White can try to make use of the c5-passed pawn, but overall I think the position’s about equal.

16.Nc7 Nxf3+ 17.gxf3 White wouldn’t have had this option if Black had started with 15…Nxf3+, although probably nothing terrible has yet happened. 





17…Bxf3 An amazing move which is hard to comment on. It seemed to me that the exchange sacrifice with 17…Nc6 was going too far: 18.Nxa8 Bxa8 19.0-0 Nd4 20.Bd1, and it’s not clear Black has enough compensation. Normally here you’d have to play 17…Ra7 18.Ne6 Bxf3 19.Nxf8 Bxh1 20.Ne6. Here Peter hadn’t noticed in advance that if the dark-squared bishop retreats there’s the move f2-f3, and he wasn’t too thrilled about that prospect. While after 20…Bd5 21.Nxg7 Kxg7 White can still torture his opponent. Svidler tried to avoid that unappealing defence, but the move he made works out badly.

18.Bxf3 Ra7 19.Nxb5 axb5 20.Ke2 White’s got an extra pawn and, in my view, a won position. 





20…Ra6 A tricky move.

21.Bb7 The only trap, which it’s a miracle I didn’t fall into, was 21.Rd1 Raf6 22.Rd3 Na6, and somehow the knight starts to jump around.

21…Re6+ 22.Be3 Bxb2 23.Rab1 Bd4 24.Rxb5 Here Black already has great difficulty making moves.

24…Na6 25.c6 Nc7 26.Rb3 Rf4 27.Rd1 Kg7 28.a4 





28…Bc5 After 28…Bxe3 29.Rxe3 Rxa4 30.Rd7 I couldn’t see how Black could save himself.

29.Rd7 Bd6 30.Rd3 Ne8 31.a5 Black resigned. After, for example, 31…Ra4 32.a6 Bxh2 33.Kf1 there’s no salvation.



Unfortunately the video of Morozevich’s demonstration no longer seems to be available at the Russian Chess Federation website. 


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Quiet chess move for a serene weekend
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


How about a quiet chess move that gives White the advantage to celebrate a serene weekend? Here is a position from Sveshnikov-Sokolov, Elista, 1996. How did White exploit Black’s lack of space.







From Alexandra Kosteniuk’s
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www.chessqueen.com

Cyprus Chess promo video
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


Here is a nice promo video by the Cyprus Chess Video. All we would say is another of those enjoyable things about chess. Cyprus is just developing as a chess nation. We wish them all the best.









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From Alexandra Kosteniuk’s
www.chessblog.com
Also see her personal blog at
www.chessqueen.com

Graz international chess open begins in Austria on Sunday
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

 

The 18th Graz International Open is starting on Sunday in Graz, Austria. It will run till September 4 and is being organised by Landesverband Steiermark des Österreichischen Schachbundes at the Brauhaus Puntigam. The tournament will be played over 9 rounds of Swiss pairings and in two rating groups.

The Group A has 62 players and six Grandmasters in the field. Top seeded is Vyacheslav Ikonnikov from Russia. Group B has 50 participants. More information on the official website
Top-10 Group A starting list:
1. GM Ikonnikov Vyacheslav RUS 2553
2. GM Kozul Zdenko CRO 2541
3. GM Shengelia David AUT 2513
4. GM Tratar Marko SLO 2491
5. GM Farago Ivan HUN 2485
6. GM Lanka Zigurds LAT 2469
7. IM Diermair Andreas AUT 2432
8. IM Moser Eva AUT 2432
9. FM Poetz Florian AUT 2416
10. IM Sakelsek Tadej SLO 2407
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Chess puzzle: White to play and checkmate in four
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011


Hi everyone,


A nice puzzle to take you into the weekend. White to play and checkmate in four. Simple enough. You can run the gameplayer to see the solution after your thinking time of five minutes.








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Also see her personal blog at
www.chessqueen.com

Moriarty And Holmes Play Chess In New Images From Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows
Chess blog for latest chess news and chess trivia (c) Alexandra Kosteniuk, 2011

Hi everyone,

Some movie news now to do with chess.

In Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows we get to see our hero match wits with his greatest enemy – Professor Moriarty, played by Jared Harris. Empire Online has released three new images from the film, one of them showing Holmes and Moriarty playing chess. The other two new images included both Jude Law as Dr. Watson and Noomi Rapace as the mystery gypsy woman Sim who joins them on their latest caper! The movie releases in December.









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Also see her personal blog at